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Brits living in Poland, Olivia Alford

It is impossible to know how many British people are currently living permanently in Poland at present, given that as fellow European Union citizens, they are not obliged to register. However, registering your stay in Poland is no straight-forward affair, and it is often necessary to have all your documentation translated into Polish and be prepared to spend a lot of time in a queue, to be asked lots of seemingly irrelevant questions and to spend most of your day doing it. Many British people who have moved to live and work in Poland permanently have done so for a multitude of reasons. Some have moved with their Polish spouses back to Poland to set up family homes. Others have taken advantage of the good business opportunities which have presented themselves since Poland joined the European Union in 2004. The demand for English language tuition by native speakers in both language schools and privately means that many British people have also been able to set themselves up as TEFL/ESL teachers in Polish towns and cities. czytaj więcej >

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Studying In Poland: A British Perspective, Olivia Alford

My decision to do postgraduate study in Krakow was a large undertaking: not only was I committing myself to at least two years of study, but the financial commitment was also significant as I had chosen to self-fund my MA studies. However, I have no regrets about going to Poland. Not only did I have the opportunity to immerse myself in a language, culture and history about which I was (and still am) deeply passionate but I also gained great experience studying at one of the best universities in Poland, experienced and appreciated a different approach to higher education and made some friends for life. czytaj więcej >

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Living in Poland, Olivia Alford

Since Poland’s accession to the European Union in 2004, the country has re-established itself as one of the economic and cultural powerhouses of Europe. Gone are the impressions that Poland is a grey, backward country stuck in its Communist past: the only country in the EU to avoid recession since the onset of the financial crisis in 2008, Poland’s economy is poised to continue to grow in 2013. Along with its open business culture, keenness to attract new ideas and inward investment from abroad, many British business people and entrepreneurs are moving to Poland to take advantage of a largely untapped business market. But it is not only business opportunities that have attracted British people to Poland. The lower crime rates, higher quality of life and lower cost of living have all contributed to an increase in the number of Brits living in Poland. czytaj więcej >